Stress

The Essential Guide

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(3 customer reviews)

People will always get divorced, leave their jobs, move home and encounter traffic jams. Instead of letting the stress take over, there are positive steps you can take to minimise its effects. Using expert advice and the latest information, this book helps you identify and deal with stressful situations, both at home and at work. Its easy-to-read style shows you what to do in extreme circumstances of stress, how to minimise the pressure you put on yourself and where to get further help and support. Relaxation strategies, complementary therapies and exercise plans are also included. Whether it’s your life that’s spiralling out of control, or you want to support someone close to you, this book is here to help. Even when you are experiencing the worst time in your life, having the tools to cope will help you to recover.


Chapter Headings

Defining Stress
Recognising Symptoms

Coping Strategies

Your Own Worst Enemy?

The 21st Century Workplace
Work-Life Balance

You Deserve the Best

Sort Your Life Out

Lie Back and Relax

Healthy Living

Complementary Medicine

Help List

Bibliography

Author Bio 

Frances Ive is a journalist, writer and PR consultant, who runs the website Healthy Soul, www.healthysoul.co.uk for people who want to take responsibility for their own wellbeing through lifestyle and natural products.
Frances has written about health for a wide range of national newspapers and women’s magazines and also wrote the book Self-Employment – The Essential Guide in the Need2Know range of titles.

Customer Reviews...

Mary Wilson -
I bought this book for my brother, who was suffering from high stress levels due to his job. This book had plenty of advice about how to identify stress and its triggers, how to deal with it and how to generally improve your whole mental health. The advice is simple and easy to follow, and the whole book is broken down into readable chunks so you don't need to spend ages reading loads of text which was ideal for my brother as firstly he's not much of a reader and secondly didn't have the time to read a long overly wordy and overly analytical book. I would recommend this for anyone who wants to be less stressed.

2013-06-27



Jen (via Amazon) -
I really like this series of books and bought this one for my brother, who was suffering from high stress levels due to his job. This book had plenty of advice about how to identify stress and its triggers, how to deal with it and how to generally improve your whole mental health. The advice is simple and easy to follow, and the whole book is broken down into readable chunks so you don't need to spend ages reading loads of text which was ideal for my brother as firstly he's not much of a reader and secondly didn't have the time to read a long overly wordy and overly analytical book. I would recommend this for anyone who wants to be less stressed.

2013-07-24



Mr. N. Moffatt (via Amazon) -
At just over 100 pages, this is better described as a booklet than a book. But it still manages to to offer a surprisingly broad coverage of causes and remedies for stress, one of the big blights on modern life. However, the shortage of page space means that few aspects of stress are dealt with in much depth. Presumably, the authors wanted to keep it short, sharp and to the point, but some pages read more like Powerpoint presentations for health professionals rather than as practical guidance for sufferers. There was also a lack of discipline with facts offered. For example, it is stated that in times of stress, insulin is released `to top up your blood sugar levels', when its job is actually the opposite (it is cortisol that enables energy release from body cells). And that green tea is relaxing (it does contain the relaxant L-Theanine, but also contains caffeine, a stimulant). The writing style is a very simplistic one, which makes the book easy to read, but this can fool the reader into taking the words on face value. The advice to release anger will therefore sound clear and obvious, but is known to exacerbate rather than calm an angry state (anger is best dealt with by re-framing). When it talks about potential job loss, it glibly states that `there are always other jobs out there', clearly out of touch with the scarcity of modern employment. It even suggest that you could occupy yourself by sorting out your garden, as if unemployment were not an issue. It states that `all exercise is good for your health and well-being', and lists rugby as an example, but fails to recognise that injuries are deleterious to health. The book does cover huge ground, and deserves great praise for that. Matters such as meditation, singing, getting a pet, neurolinguistic programming (NLP) and practical advice on dealing with work situations are very useful. But the book lacks anecdote - to suggest that you simply learn to say `no' when confronting people would really benefit from life examples. We often know we should say no, but get tongue tied trying. Such examples could be supplied as appendices to keep the main book brief and to the point. It does, however, supply valuable contact details at various points, such as for trauma counselling and work-life balancing. In summary, the book will work well for those who are stressed but not really sure why, illuminating situations that may be the key factors for you, and providing pointers to further reading. But the advice it offers is a bit too lightweight and idealistic to be practical on its own.

2013-07-24



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